Minutiae
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The more corrupt the state, the more numerous the laws.
--Cornelius Tacitus (c. 116 A.D.)

Wednesday, September 18, 2002
Every time you hear someone argue that the US shouldn't be the world policeman think of this. The UN has almost no ability to enforce its will without the US military. What has the UN been able to do about this? Come in after the fact and try some of the most notorious offenders? Which is worse, to go in and interfere with the affairs of others, or to have the ability to stop something like this and not do so? This details the actions that the US and the UN should be ashamed of. The UN failed to act to stop genocide. They deliberately refrained from using the word because had they formally recognized it as such they would have been legally obligated to act. (why was the UN formed after all?) As Kofi Annan said:
"... The world must deeply repent this failure. Rwanda's tragedy was the world's tragedy. All of us who cared about Rwanda, all of us who witnessed its suffering, fervently wish that we could have prevented the genocide. Looking back now, we see the signs which then were not recognized. Now we know that what we did was not nearly enough--not enough to save Rwanda from itself, not enough to honor the ideals for which the United Nations exists. We will not deny that, in their greatest hour of need, the world failed the people of Rwanda ..."
posted by Rachel 9/18/2002
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Hmmm there's a thought. First get these general concepts in mind:
Free speech, the printing press, pamphlets, Tom Paine, free flow of info, an educated society...
This
guy suggests: "I think the US Military should install wireless networks and give away cheap WebPads everywhere we liberate a suffering people, such as in Afghanistan or (hopefully) Iraq.
Make them compatible with eDinar and let them feel the cool breeze of free enterprise and open information."

Rather than dropping ideological pamphlets could we wage ideological warfare by getting them online? (setting aside any technological or logistical constraints) I don't know. People would have to be literate to begin with. Also there's a period of several years that it may take to develop savvy and critical thinking in the face of access to infinite info, disinfo, and opinions after having almost no access to same for perhaps the entire history of the culture. It would certainly be a destabilizing influence. (not that stability is necessarily a desirable thing)
posted by Rachel 9/18/2002
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Here's the text of the letter from Iraq to the UN.
posted by Rachel 9/18/2002
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Ahhh nothing like a cold refreshing Lileks.
posted by Rachel 9/18/2002
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Well another birthday come and gone. Really, after 21 they just aren't that momentous. I'm another year older woo hoo.
posted by Rachel 9/18/2002
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